WARNER BAXTER

WARNER BAXTER

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THIS IS AN ORIGINAL SIGNED PHOTO OF WARNER BAXTER. YOU ARE GETTING THE ORIGINAL PICTURE SENT TO YOU AND HER SPIRIT ALONG WITH IT. THESE CAME FROM AN OLDER MAN WHO PRACTICED THE OCCULT AND ENJOYED FILLING HIS HOME WITH FAMOUS PEOPLE. WHAT HE DID WAS GIVE EACH OF THEM A SPACE ON A HALLWAY WALL AND THEY HAD FULL USE OF HIS HOUSE AND COMMUNICATED WITH HIM. THEY CAN HELP YOU IN VARIOUS WAYS AND ALL ARE FRIENDLY. EACH HAS THEIR OWN PERSONALITY AND INTERESTS. YOU CAN READ ABOUT THEM BELOW. ALL BELOW INFORMATION WAS TAKEN FROM WIKIPEDIA.

Warner Leroy Baxter (March 29, 1889 – May 7, 1951) was an American actor, known for his role as The Cisco Kid in In Old Arizona (1929), for which he won the second Academy Award for Best Actor in the 1928-1929 Academy Awards. Warner Baxter started his movie career in silent movies. Baxter's most notable silent movie is probably The Great Gatsby (1926) and The Awful Truth (1925). Today The Great Gatsby is one of many lost films of the silent era. When talking movies came out Warner Baxter became even more famous in movies than he was in silent movies. Warner Baxter's most notable movies in the never ending talking era of film are In Old Arizona (1929) 42nd Street (1932), and the 1931 20 minute short movie, The Slippery Pearls.

Contents [hide]

* 1 Background * 2 Career * 3 Personal life * 4 Filmography * 5 References * 6 External links [edit] Background

Baxter was born in Columbus, Ohio, and moved to San Francisco, California with his widowed mother in 1898, when he was nine. Following the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, he and his family lived in a tent for two weeks. By 1910 Baxter was in vaudeville, and from there began acting on the stage.

[edit] Career Baxter originally worked as an insurance agent, sales manager and commercial traveller. Baxter began his movie career as an extra in 1914 in a stock company and quickly rose to become a star. He had his first starring role in 1921, in a film called Sheltered Daughters. He starred in 48 features during the 1920s. His most famous starring role was as the Cisco Kid in In Old Arizona (1929), the first all-talking western, for which he won the second Academy Award for Best Actor. He also starred in 42nd Street (1933), Grand Canary (1934), Broadway Bill (1934) and in Kidnapped (1938).

By 1936, Baxter was the highest paid actor in Hollywood,[citation needed] but by 1943 he had slipped to B-movie roles, and he starred in a series of "Crime Doctor" films for Columbia Pictures. Baxter made over 100 films between 1914 and 1950. [edit] Personal life

Baxter married actress Winifred Bryson in 1918, remaining married until his death in 1951. He suffered for several years from arthritis, and in 1951 he underwent a lobotomy to ease the pain.[1] He died shortly after of pneumonia and was interred in Forest Lawn Memorial Park Cemetery in Glendale, California.

He has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 6290 Hollywood Boulevard.